Chapter 14 impression post

--Original published at Loretta Gabrielle

For this impression I picked the first one. In films and movies which regard the topic of mental illnesses they are either glorified and romanticized or seen as an abolishment and or a sin. After watching the video it demonstrated different sensory and understanding which other people with schizophrenia face. Before watching the video it had a sensory and I thought there was a possibility of something startling me as someone with schizophrenia might face. The beginning of the video was fairly normal but as it progresses it demonstrated different voices in their head and possible fear. After the fear, more panic sets in and it continues. Most of the fear which people struggle with are self doubt which control their thoughts. It is as though everything is against them which they hear in their head. After watching the video it showed the individual with schizophrenia before they took their medications and it was as though everything was attacking them. This video didn’t change the idea of what I thought people with schizophrenia were. In the media, it is mostly similar to this since most of the media views people who have schizophrenia without medication, similarly to this video. Based off of what happened in the video, without the medication it could possibly escalate to what is shown in the media. The difference was how livable it is. The video didn’t show the impacts of it with medication but most media outlets show it as debilitating. Lastly, I didn’t realize how much self doubt and presence of depression/ thoughts linked to depression were in schizophrenia. The majority of the internal voices which were in the film were self-doubt and internal hatred. The main feeling, I felt the person expressed was worthlessness or the fear of being worthless. I originally thought something would pop out and startle me but what the person was doing was normal daily activities and having internal fear and thoughts of self doubt.

Media Production

--Original published at Loretta Gabrielle

My Article Summary of the Journal:

The researchers of the study, conducted an experiment as to whether or not forensic evidence had bias from criminal stereotypes. The researchers target audience were individuals in the criminal justice system and society as a whole, with main focus on forensic examiners and fingerprinting. The stem from this research originated from a forensic examiner questioning their teams methods when they mistakenly suggested an Muslim man was guilty for a bombing. The reasoning of this wrongful arrest was because Brandon Mayfield, the Muslim man mistakenly charged, fit the FBI’s profile and stereotype of what a terrorist bomber would look like.

So, what is a criminal stereotype? A criminal stereotype relates an individual’s appearances, looks, beliefs, and characteristics with a certain crime. In this example, a criminal stereotype was assuming a Muslim man was the perpetrator of a bombing. This occurs similarly with other crimes matched with certain characteristics. In this experiment, the researchers conducted a trial study which matched different crimes with different characteristics. The participants of the study were college students which generated different assumptions of criminal stereotypes. The purpose of this trial study was to demonstrate how social stereotypes played into role, demonstrating a cause and effect.

This led to the main experiment of the research. The researchers selected 225 undergraduate college students from a large variety of ethnic backgrounds without any known knowledge of criminal justice. The journal overlooked any reasoning for why or how the participants were selected, leaving out critical operationalizing variables. The participants read a mock police report with mock fingerprints of two crimes which were said to be found at the scene of the crime. The research journal left out how they were separated but, half of the participants were matched with an middle-aged Asian woman named Mei Lee, while the other half matched with White middle-aged male named Steve Johnson as the perpetrator. The two crimes in question were child molestation and identity theft, one which was stereotypically matched with distinct characteristics of a perpetrator and another crime which did not match with any specific trait. The participants were told to state whether they thought the individual the database matched at the scene of the crime, was or was not the perpetrator. The findings demonstrated most participants associated child molestation with Steve Johnson, a White middle-aged man as the perpetrator whereas the characteristics of identity theft had little impact when deciding who the perpetrator was. The research demonstrated how social and criminal stereotypes negatively impact and create a disadvantage for individuals who fit these characteristics.

The research journal suggested different ways for forensic examiners evaluation of fingerprinting through a variety of systems. An example provided was a filler method which had a mock criminal stereotype given to a forensic examiner. If the examiner suggested the perpetrator matched the crime, it would determine the examiner as unreliable and in need of improved forensic techniques. The information in the journal can improve the criminal justice system along with society as a whole to help prevent negative biases from criminal stereotypes. This study is able to create awareness to criminal stereotypes in forensic evidence which lead to wrongful arrests.

Review of Summarizing the Journal

Through the process, I understand the perspective and difficulties reporters have when reviewing an experiment. The news article disregarded several factors of the five research questions. In my summary, I prioritized by answering the questions which the news article left out. I was able to address every question other than how the participants were selected since it was missing from the research journal. In completing the article summary I found it easily done after finishing both the pop critique and scholarly review assignments.

In summarizing the research article, there were several different details in the news article which was part of the study but not the overall purpose. For example, the article disregarded details about the participants but capitalized on the journalists personal experiences of social stereotypes. Although this information is useful for the findings in the article, it takes away important details which are vital in the experiment. When deciding the information to take out, personal aspects became eliminated and replaced with the details regarding the five critical questions. The questions I addressed in the summary were operationalized variables, how the groups were assigned, method of causal claims, and targeting the right audience. This differs from the news article as it only addressed the method of casual claims and how the groups were assigned. The additional information I left out were  details regarding the accumulation of different fingerprints the criminal database provides. I minimized the statistical factors when creating the article summary as most readers, including myself, would struggle understanding the point and purpose of it. I found the main goal of the study was to demonstrate the reason as to why the researchers were conducting the experiment, the details in the experiment, the findings of the experiment, and what to improve upon which was implemented in my summary.

In comparison to my summary with the news article we both left out how the participants were selected. The article disregarded the operationalized variables which my summary provided regarding the participants in the study. Both my summary and the article discuss the presence of causal claims from the journal along with how participants were assigned. In the article, casual claim were frequently used and demonstrated through the findings of the research. The presence of criminal stereotypes caused a higher likelihood of biases in the criminal justice system, a cause and effect. The summary I provided answered part of the five critical research questions which the article summary did not. In my summary, the details regarding the generalization to the correct population and who the participants in the research were specified while the article summary focused on strictly forensic examiners.

My perspective on journalist has changed after studying and reviewing the pop culture research critique, scholarly article, and the media production assignments. From the pop culture research critique, the majority of the article left out information regarding the five research questions. After reading the article, the assumed participants were forensic examiners rather than college students. The lack of information provided in the article left room for incorrect assumption and mistakes, damaging the validity of the news article. The pop culture research brought attention of the missing information as the article was unable to answer all five of the research questions. The lack of information the news article provided which the pop critiques capitalized on, provided awareness to flaws in other research articles which may have been overlooked. Although I found the article summary untrustworthy, it continues as a reminder of attentiveness in research. The mistakes the journalist made are understandable as some of the information of the five research questions were missing. When writing a journal article, it is difficult for journalists to add any personal opinion in the summary with limited space.

In the scholarly article, it provided the analysis of the research journal and the information the news article lacked. Most of the information found in the research journal added to the missing information from regarding the five research questions which the news article left out. Originally the news article was only able to answer two questions while my summary was able to answer four of them. The scholarly article provided a larger understanding of the difficulties journalist may face when looking at a study. The article picked out the important details of the study while also acknowledging the back story and purpose of the experiment. This assignment differed from the pop culture critique by providing a larger insight to the difficulties journalist face in understanding the content of research journals and deciphering the important and interesting facts readers would understand.

In this media production assignment, it allowed the students to become the news article journalists rather than strictly the critiques. By understanding and picking apart the flaws in the new article and understanding the details from the journal, it allowed me to concentrate on the important facts while creating my summary. After the completion of the summary, the assignment allowed reflection and understanding of the flaws in each component and how to distinguish a valid article summary from an invalid one. In this specific article, I believe the author had a large oversight in most of the information and did not prioritize it as well as they could have. Although the journalist could have been more attentive in incorporating the important details of the study, I understand the difficulties of completing a word limit of a news article with an extremely detailed research journal.

 

Work Cited

Madon, Stephanie, et al. The Perfect Match: Do Criminal Stereotypes Bias Forensic                Evidence Analysis?, vol. 40, no. 4, 2016, pp. 420–429., doi:10.18411/d-2016-154.

“The Perfect Match.” Monitor on Psychology, American Psychological Association, 19 Oct.                      2016, http://www.apa.org/pubs/highlights/spotlight/issue-82.aspx.

News Article: http://www.apa.org/pubs/highlights/spotlight/issue-82.aspx

Journal Article: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/features/lhb-lhb0000190.pdf

 

 

Chapter 14: First Impression Post

--Original published at KatieMillerPSY105

For this first impression post, I chose to do the first option of watching the simulation of a person with schizophrenia. When watching this video, I was thinking about how difficult this illness would be to live with. You can’t control the voices in your head, you can’t control the scents you smell, and you can’t control the hallucinations you have. This video showed the person experiencing hallucinations from the tv and from the pizza. The pizza was called “poison” by the voices in the person’s head. It would be hard to have to go through everyday hearing voices saying hurtful things to you. In a way, I thought this video was a little creepy or scary to me. I did not know a whole lot about how real schizophrenic people (not how the media portrays them) were, so when I watched the simulation I thought that it would be scary for those who were diagnosed with this illness.

I believe that the media portrays people with schizophrenia as “crazy” people. They show people with this illness as frantic and out of control whereas the person in this video was more calm and relaxed during the episode. I think that the media could do a better job of raising awareness about this disorder and how it can affect anyone who has it differently. Overall, I found this video very interesting and I now have a better understanding of what it is like for someone who has schizophrenia.

Media Production

--Original published at CatherinesCollegeBlog

Researchers recently studied the effects of caffeine on the human brain, specifically looking for an increase in entropy that would make brains better able to handle this unpredictable world. Since people often rely on coffee or tea to keep them focused on a task or give them an energy boost of ideas when they feel stuck, it was originally believed that caffeine must have a lowering effect on entropy levels, creating a more ordered brain system. After performing the study, researchers instead proved the opposite effect.

Researchers began their study by recruiting participants from Hangzhou Normal University in China, as well as from the local community in Hangzhou. Sixty participants formed the sample for the study, including thirty males and thirty females. These participants were required to meet a certain criteria in order to be admitted into the study. They could not have had abnormal structural MRI, they had to be within 20-26 years of age, they could not have any neuropsychological issues or magnetic objects in their bodies, and they could not be taking medications that would affect central blood flow to the brain. Researchers used MRI scans of the brain to detect changes in brain entropy levels of each participant before and after ingesting caffeine. The study was performed over two days and participants were randomly assigned to two groups, A and B, each containing fifteen males and fifteen females. Researchers chose for participants to ingest a caffeine pill instead of having them drink a cup of coffee or tea. This allowed for more control in the experiment, as they knew the exact amount of caffeine each person was ingesting in the 200mg pill. Both groups received a brain scan each day to use as comparison images. Group A received a scan and a caffeine pill on the first day, then returned for another scan the following day so the caffeine had 24 hours to digest. Group B only received a scan on the first day, then was given the caffeine pill the next day along with another scan thirty minutes after ingestion.

What they found was not only an increase in brain entropy, but also a decrease in central blood flow after participants had caffeine within their systems. While central blood flow was reduced across the entire brain, entropy levels only experienced an increase in certain regions of the brain. These regions of increased brain entropy included the default mode network with a 16.09 percent spike, the visual cortex with a 14.48 percent jump, the motor network with an 8.13 percent rise, and the lateral prefrontal cortex with a 7.70 percent growth. Since caffeine is known to have the largest effect on cognitive functions of awareness, movement, and alertness, it made sense that the areas of the brain responsible for the operation of these functions experienced a rise in entropy levels with a little help from caffeine. Including these increased levels of entropy in terms of percentages more clearly operationalized the dependent variable of brain entropy levels, instead of simply stating whether or not they went up; however, the individual data was not provided regarding the increase each participant experienced, which may have been useful. The caffeine pill was the independent variable in the experiment, operationalized based on the amount of caffeine it contained and to some degree, the timing of when participants ingested the pill.

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine and the human brain entropy levels, not whether or not caffeine helps us write a better essay or complete tasks more efficiently. Many people look for the quick fix to a problem or challenge. After reading about a study like this, they likely jump to the conclusion that coffee allows for a higher capacity of the brain to process information. It is important to remember that this was strictly performed as a correlational study, searching for relationships between caffeine and entropy levels, while stumbling upon the effect on central blood flow levels. The increase in entropy and decrease in central blood flow had a correlation ranging from -0.5 to -0.4. Caffeine and entropy were clearly found to have a positive correlation, as participants increased caffeine levels in their bodies and, shortly after, experienced an increase in entropy levels. This correlation currently only allows for suggestions and assumptions, as this study did not specifically experiment with cognitive functions or data relating to this. Correlation does not allow for causation, so while it is acceptable to credit a rise in entropy levels to the ingestion of caffeine, it is not yet scientifically supported to state that caffeine ingestion directly leads to an increase in the brain’s capability to process more complex information.

Reflection:

I first made sure to include more information about the participants, as the news article did not mention any details aside from the number of participants the study used. When data is collected from a group of people, regardless of the study, there will be different results depending on the characteristics of each group. In this case, if the study was performed on people with previous brain injuries or people who are regular coffee or tea drinkers, the results would have likely been different. After only reading the news article at the beginning of this project, I had no idea whether I should be comparing myself and the possible personal effects I would experience as a result of caffeine with the effects and results experienced by the participants. After reading the scholarly article, which included the age, gender, health background, and previous caffeine use of the participants, I can better compare the results to myself and decide how intensely I would like to apply the findings to my own routine. I also made sure to mention the correlational aspect of this study, as it was solely looking for a relationship between the variables. News articles tend to produce more flashy and intriguing writing that sometimes alters the truth a bit. The simple proven fact that caffeine increases brain entropy levels does not also conclude that caffeine increases the information processing abilities of the brain. This was an important distinction that I felt was necessary to include. I left out diagrams of brain scans and their explanations from the scholarly article, simply because they were difficult to understand. A normal person reading this should not have to have a background in psychology or scientific brain imaging techniques in order to understand the main idea. My summary includes what I felt were the most important aspects of the five critical questions for reading research. The news article failed to mention details about the sample group, the timing of the study, and that this was strictly a correlational study. I made these aspects more clear for the reader, so the information could be more accurately applied to his or her personal circumstances. I did not feel that it was critical to include whether or not conclusions are generalized to the right population, since this is still not entirely clear. There need to be further studies done in this same manner, as well as adding the cognitive functioning aspect to collect data about this effect of caffeine before it can be applied to certain groups of people or an entire population.

With the restrictions this assignment involved in terms of word count, I can see why journalists have trouble including every aspect of a research study, especially one like this. There was also a lot of complex scientific data and information included in the scholarly article that would have been difficult to incorporate into a news article. This is likely why journalists of news articles focus more on any attention-grabbing information they can find from the research. People do not necessarily care about caffeine as an antagonist to adenosine, especially since most would not even know what that means. What people are looking for in a news article is any groundbreaking findings they can apply to their own lives, such as how the coffee they drink each day might be making them smarter. I would definitely give credit to journalists who find a way to keep the story intriguing without leaving out critical details of research that establish credibility.

Works Cited

Chang, Da, et al. “Caffeine Caused a Widespread Increase of Resting Brain Entropy.” Scientific

Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 2018, doi:10.1038/s41598-018-21008-6.

McDonald, Hal. “A Little Chaos With Your Coffee?” Psychology Today, Sussex Publishers, 2

July 2018, http://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/time-travelling-apollo/201807/little-chaos-your-coffee.

News Article: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/time-travelling-apollo/201807/little-chaos-your-coffee

Scholarly Article: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-21008-6

Media Production Project

--Original published at KatieMillerPSY105

Mental health services on college campuses have become more prevalent in recent years due to the implementation of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and increased media attention. Most colleges highlight their student wellness services in an effort to attract and support students. While institutes of higher education spend significant resources to aid the student population in mental health issues, little was known of the extent of mental disabilities in faculty and staff. Most information on faculty mental health came from self-disclosure in papers and at conferences. Four researchers, Margaret Price, Mark S. Salzer, Amber O’Shea, and Stephanie L. Kerschbaum, decided to study faculty members with mental health histories and the support they receive on campus.

Their article “Disclosure of Mental Disability by College and University Faculty: The Negotiation of Accommodations, Supports, and Barriers” addresses faculty mental health in the first large group survey across higher education institutions in the United States. This comprehensive survey provides more detail into previous conclusions or “hunches” based on small-scale studies and first-person accounts, including personal experiences by the researchers.

This innovative survey compiled the results of 267 college and university faculty members who self-identified as having mental illness, mental-health histories or mental disabilities. Participants were solicited through electronic communications in Listservs, direct emails to college human resources departments and outreach to professional organizations. The survey was designed to be anonymous to allow for greater participation without possible stigma attached to respondents.

The primary objectives of the survey were to determine the familiarity of faculty to mental health accommodations available under the law and the extent of accommodations and support they received. Almost 70% of respondents indicated that they had no or limited familiarity with the accommodations available at their institution. More interesting, only 13% of respondents actually requested accommodations, while the majority (87%) did not. Some reasons given for not requesting accommodations included not needing any special accommodations, not being aware of accommodations, negative impact to tenure/promotion, or personal privacy reasons. Respondents were concerned about the stigma of mental illness and the impact on credibility as faculty. These results mirror the personal experiences of the authors in their respective college settings.

Another interesting finding of the survey was that about half of the faculty disclosed their mental health history to a colleague even though they did not avail themselves of college services. Only 10% of participants had disclosed the information to a dean, provost or the Office of Disability Services. Some of the reasons provided for not disclosing information to college administration were personal privacy or negative impacts to promotion/tenure, contract renewal or even employment.

From a support perspective, the study found that the majority of respondents found much more mental health support from family, friends and outside professionals than with services provided on campus or with colleagues and supervisors.

This study provides more insight into faculty members seeking support for their mental health issues and indicating that most faculty do not use available college services. As fear and stigma are cited by many as a reason to not seek accommodations at their college, the authors believe more work is needed in both practical accommodations and in ideological change in recognizing psychiatric disabilities in the academic workplace. While further studies are needed to determine the extent of faculty mental health issues across college campuses, these results demonstrate that current college and university mechanisms for dealing with mental disabilities in faculty are inadequate.

 

Work Cited

 

Flaherty, Colleen. “Study of Faculty Members with Mental Health Issues Finds Mix of Attitudes on Disclosing and Seeking Assistance.” Esports Quickly Expanding in Colleges, Inside Higher Ed, 8 June 2017, www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/06/08/study-faculty-members-mental-health-issues-finds-mix-attitudes-disclosing-and.

Price, M., Salzer, M. S., Oshea, A., & Kerschbaum, S. L. (2017). Disclosure of Mental Disability by College and University Faculty: The Negotiation of Accommodations, Supports, and Barriers. Disability Studies Quarterly, 37(2). doi:10.18061/dsq.v37i2.5487

http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/5487/4653

 

 

Reflection:

 

One of the most challenging aspects of summarizing academic research is to determine what information to include for the readers. Since this academic study was based on survey questions rather than scientific experiment, the results are more easily presented to the public since definition of scientific terms and methodology are not needed. However, some of the survey results need to be left out of the article for sake of length and readability. I was also concerned to present the survey results in a manner that preserves the academic summary rather than persuade readers by selectively disclosing pieces of information.

I decided to remove some of the detailed demographic information for the respondents as the details of type of professor (assistant, associate, full or non-tenure-track) or type of institution (graduate school, four-year undergraduate, community colleges) may not be as important to the readers of the article. By highlighting the main objectives of the study, I feel that I can convey the findings without dedicating too much space to specific figures. As in the original pop culture article, I did not reproduce the tabular summary of results. However, I did want to incorporate some of the survey results into the summary by highlighting the lack of awareness of accommodations, reasons for not requesting accommodations and the resources faculty uses for support.

As the scientific study was based on survey responses rather than a scientific experiment with control groups, I attempted to address the five critical questions for reading research as best as possible. I wanted to disclose the variables used in the study including the definition of self-identified mental health issues and describing the method for selecting participants, the correlations from the study results and the opportunities for further studies. Since these results are based on survey responses rather than a scientific experiment with control groups, my media report does not make any casual claims or generalizations.

There are some similarities between my media production and Colleen Flaherty’s article, “Portrait of Faculty Mental Health.” Both narratives summarized the key elements of the scholarly article by addressing the stigma of disclosure of mental illness and low percentage of faculty utilizing accommodations. Both my summary and the article detailed the parameters of the study including selection of participants, the variable of mental health issues in faculty and the opportunities for further study. Neither of us made any casual claims or generalizations. Flaherty had the ability to receive direct feedback from the researchers to add additional content to her article. I had also reached out to the principal author of the study, but I was not able to receive any additional insight into the study or more recent follow up. This additional information would have aided in my summary as approximately 30% of Flaherty’s article contains direct quotes from the researchers. The news article also provided more statistical detail than my summary. I felt that the readers would still understand the overall findings of the survey with fewer numerical amounts and could reference the original study for the detailed information. My intention was to support the study findings that college faculty is generally unaware of accommodations on campus and tends not to disclose mental health issues to administration.

After reading the pop culture article and the scholarly research article, I have a much better appreciation for describing psychological research. I feel that Flaherty’s news article effectively covered the academic survey, including the parameters and results. I initially thought that I could easily summarize the academic research into a media report effectively addressing the five critical questions for reading research while making the summary enjoyable to read. It is much more difficult to summarize almost 18 pages of scholarly work into a two-page article. I first had to read through the academic report a few times to fully comprehend the major themes to be sure that I could articulate them appropriately. While I felt that the pop culture article was a nice summary, I wanted to be sure that I covered all the important issues without distorting the results by adding my own commentary or selected facts. I did not have the opportunity to interview the authors as the pop culture article did, but those insights would have been beneficial to my summary. For reporting on scientific articles, I feel that it is critically important for the author to fully comprehend the intent of the research and the appropriate findings, conclusions or generalizations. I appreciate the opportunity to create the media production, but I believe that I need much more background in technical writing and scientific theory to be an accomplished scientific journalist.

Chapter 14 First Impression

--Original published at CatherinesCollegeBlog

I chose the first option for this post. After watching the video that stimulates the experience of a person with schizophrenia, I immediately felt bad for anyone who has to experience this all the time. The constant voice that was demonstrated in the video, either telling the schizophrenic person she was stupid or wrong, seems incredibly difficult to live with. It is like having a constant reminder about any insecurity or doubt we may feel, but it likely feels to schizophrenic people that there is no escape from this voice. It must feel very unsettling too, especially when you think the worst is going to happen at all times. Even when the pizza delivery guy was simply doing his job and not trying to raise suspicion about other motives, the schizophrenic person immediately believed he was out to get her or knew something bad she had done and was trying to get revenge. I would not like to be forced to combat this negative, doubtful voice in my head at all times, so I feel for those who have to face this challenge. The video also mentions that there is no one typical case for a schizophrenic person, which would discourage me. These people do not know the exact symptoms or reactions they are supposed to experience after being diagnosed with this disorder, so it is a gamble regarding what they will experience and the degree to which it will affect them. Personally, I have not watched a movie or seen in the media a schizophrenic person, so I am not exactly sure how they are typically portrayed. If I had to guess, I would say they are probably demonstrated as acting out of control with their thoughts and behaviors. They are likely portrayed as crazy people, and since media likes to keep things intriguing and stretch the truth, they probably do not get judged based on the challenging situation they are in. The media likely leads people to believe that schizophrenic people have more control over their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, when in reality they do not. Providing a reasonable explanation for something intriguing makes it less interesting for viewers, which is why they are likely only seen by their characteristics, not their situation.

Mental Illness

--Original published at Tiffany'sCollegeBlog

For this week’s first impression on chapter 14, I chose to do option 1, which is to watch a video on schizophrenia and share what we thought about it and then compare it to the media and schizophrenia. To start this all off, I don’t believe that I’ve seen anything having to do with schizo and out of the major films listed in the prompt, I don’t think I’ve seen any of them. So right off the bat, comparing this to the media, I haven’t seen anything having to do with schizo, so maybe that should be a good thing to be brought up in society. Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may seem like they have lost touch with reality. After watching the video, I don’t really feel any different about schizophrenia. I don’t know much about it to make any assumptions or even form an opinion. I do think that it probably is one of the disorders that does go under looked and anything or anyone having to do with schizophrenia should be looked at. I think the video was portrayed well enough but there wasn’t much background to base anything off of.  

Chapter 14: First Impression

--Original published at Kirsten's Kreations

For this post, I chose to do the first option because I wanted to understand the struggles people with schizophrenia go through. When starting this video I was sort of weary about it because I didn’t know what to expect. At first it didn’t see anything that much out of the normal because there were just small flashes of every day normal things such as brushing teeth and reading the news paper. Then the voices start and that is when things started to get weird. The voices were harsh to the person you were simulated to be. Them telling the person they were worthless, there was poison in the food or drinks, and how people were on to the person. It make me feel scared and worried for the person. It is also interesting to see that people like this can experience things that aren’t actually there like the headline of the newspaper changing and the coffee in the mug bubbling. In this film, the person them-self seems to be more calm than I expected. In the media, people with schizophrenia seemed to more frantic about trying to calm the voices and the things they see. More so it seems to me it depends on the person as to how they react to their schizophrenia acting up. The media does tend to do an okay job and being able to express the person with this problem having voices and seeing things that can’t be heard or seen by others.

Preventing Suicide Among College Students

--Original published at Tiffany'sCollegeBlog

After reading “Preventing Suicide Among College Students,” by Jane Brody, the article brought back a memory that stuck with me while I was at my first college, Susquehanna University. I was told that we get our mid term break because that was a time when some college students would get suicidal. Suicide is the act or an instance of taking one’s own life voluntarily and intentionally. A college student has to deal with a lot when going away to school; the adjustment from high school to college, the amount of work given by professors, being out on their own in a new environment, and not being surrounded by the people who care about them the most. It’s often times very hard for a college student to get used to it that quickly as well and it can have a physical, emotional, and social toll on how it affects them. Often times when a student goes away, they might not tell their parents or friends everything that they should know and because technically we are “adults” now and go by the law, the colleges can not say  anything, especially if there is a lot of difficulties. The law that prevents colleges from alerting parents when their students are in trouble and having difficulties is the FERPA, or the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. The article also includes a persona story of Brody, which explains how she helps someone avoid suicide. There are many places on campus that can help college students and be a nice resource when they need someone to talk to like the counseling centers. They can help students talk through things and even offer treatment for students. Most counseling centers can offer academic help as well as emotional help. Along with suicide, depression goes along with it and both have increased throughout the years. Some schools have made it a big priority to keep up with the demand so that students can continue to be happy and healthy. Many have added full-time counselors and employees to provide services for the students. There are also some websites like “Caring Community” that can help students with any health related issues that occur. Other websites like “Notice and Respond” can direct anyone who is concerned about a friend or peer by giving signs to look out for like risk taking and verbal or written threats and suggestions for how to handle a situation. While there are ways to handle situations like this on a college campus, there are ways to contact the parents, so they can assist as well. The students giving the school a grant so that they can talk to the parents is one way and the other is for a friend to contact the parents, if they have the information to do so. Being an active parent can help your student realize that you are only a phone call away and that they can always call whenever they need you.

After summarizing the article, I realize how difficult it is to get every fine and vivid detail into a summary without restating the entire article and copying all of the article. Summarizing teaches students how to discern the most important ideas in a text, how to ignore irrelevant information, and how to integrate the central ideas in a meaningful way. I think that when people do summarize we tend to hit all the main points that we can but under a word limit, it gets more complicated because you have to focus on what the readers will understand and making it simple and to the point. The process alone is kind of hard to decide what a really good details to include and what would make the summary beneficial to those who read it. I didn’t leave anything important out because I feel like this whole article is important. It’s a very touchy subject and every thing that I included is significant. Even if I did leave something out, it’s only because I don’t know how to summarize it without taking it word for word. My perspective on journalists have changed a little bit but not a whole lot. Knowing people who write for the university paper makes a difference because I see how hard it is for them to write something. I would say that the only thing that makes it hard still is the fact that you don’t know what is true and what is false with articles. The whole project itself relies on whether or not you are a good summarizer so it depends on how you were taught to summarize.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/02/well/preventing-suicide-among-college-students.html 

Preventing Suicide Among College Students

--Original published at Tiffany'sCollegeBlog

After reading “Preventing Suicide Among College Students,” by Jane Brody, the article brought back a memory that stuck with me while I was at my first college, Susquehanna University. I was told that we get our mid term break because that was a time when some college students would get suicidal. Suicide is the act or an instance of taking one’s own life voluntarily and intentionally. A college student has to deal with a lot when going away to school; the adjustment from high school to college, the amount of work given by professors, being out on their own in a new environment, and not being surrounded by the people who care about them the most. It’s often times very hard for a college student to get used to it that quickly as well and it can have a physical, emotional, and social toll on how it affects them. Often times when a student goes away, they might not tell their parents or friends everything that they should know and because technically we are “adults” now and go by the law, the colleges can not say  anything, especially if there is a lot of difficulties. The law that prevents colleges from alerting parents when their students are in trouble and having difficulties is the FERPA, or the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. The article also includes a persona story of Brody, which explains how she helps someone avoid suicide. There are many places on campus that can help college students and be a nice resource when they need someone to talk to like the counseling centers. They can help students talk through things and even offer treatment for students. Most counseling centers can offer academic help as well as emotional help. Along with suicide, depression goes along with it and both have increased throughout the years. Some schools have made it a big priority to keep up with the demand so that students can continue to be happy and healthy. Many have added full-time counselors and employees to provide services for the students. There are also some websites like “Caring Community” that can help students with any health related issues that occur. Other websites like “Notice and Respond” can direct anyone who is concerned about a friend or peer by giving signs to look out for like risk taking and verbal or written threats and suggestions for how to handle a situation. While there are ways to handle situations like this on a college campus, there are ways to contact the parents, so they can assist as well. The students giving the school a grant so that they can talk to the parents is one way and the other is for a friend to contact the parents, if they have the information to do so. Being an active parent can help your student realize that you are only a phone call away and that they can always call whenever they need you.

After summarizing the article, I realize how difficult it is to get every fine and vivid detail into a summary without restating the entire article and copying all of the article. Summarizing teaches students how to discern the most important ideas in a text, how to ignore irrelevant information, and how to integrate the central ideas in a meaningful way. I think that when people do summarize we tend to hit all the main points that we can but under a word limit, it gets more complicated because you have to focus on what the readers will understand and making it simple and to the point. The process alone is kind of hard to decide what a really good details to include and what would make the summary beneficial to those who read it. I didn’t leave anything important out because I feel like this whole article is important. It’s a very touchy subject and every thing that I included is significant. Even if I did leave something out, it’s only because I don’t know how to summarize it without taking it word for word. My perspective on journalists have changed a little bit but not a whole lot. Knowing people who write for the university paper makes a difference because I see how hard it is for them to write something. I would say that the only thing that makes it hard still is the fact that you don’t know what is true and what is false with articles. The whole project itself relies on whether or not you are a good summarizer so it depends on how you were taught to summarize.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/02/well/preventing-suicide-among-college-students.html